Roger Lee Hall - Official Site

 

 

 

 

 

With many years of music activity, Roger Lee Hall has been actively seeking to preserve American music from the past and create music for the present day through his compositions and music editions.

He has been involved with both research and recordings. His many activities include:
album producer, cable television producer, composer, conductor, ethnomusicologist, musicologist, film music critic, lecturer, radio host, singer, teacher and writer.

Born in New Jersey, his first music compisitons were pop and jazz songs in the 1960s. Following his military service in the U.S. Army, Mr. Hall attended Upsala College and then Rutgers University, Newark College of Arts & Sciences where he graduated in1970 with a B.A. degree in Music Theory and Composition. He composed his first classical works while at Rutgers.

Two years later, in 1972, he was awarded his M.A. degree in Ethnomusicology from the State University of New York at Binghamton (now Binghamton University). His Master's Thesis was on the music notation of the American Shakers.

He did his Ph.D. studies in Musicology at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, where his specialty was Shaker music and music from early America. He was also teaching assistant for the famous Cleveland disc jockey, Bill Randle, who had promoted Elvis Presley and introduced him on his national television debut in 1956. Recently, he has written about this disc jockey in a multimedia volume titled, The Bill Randle Chronicles: From Electric Elvis to The Shakers -- click here.

Mr. Hall has been a music consultant for various projects including these topics:

-the music of Tonga for the National Geographic Society LP album (1972)
-the music of Colonial America for the Paul Revere House in Boston (1981)
-the best-selling CD, "Simple Gifts - Shaker Chants and Spirituals" by The Boston Camerata (1995)
-the DVD titled, "Emerson: The Ideal in America" for The Ralph Waldo Emerson Institute (2007)

He has spent considerable time researching and recording two singing traditions which are among the oldest in the United States of America:



Music of the Shakers -- from the 18th to 20th centuries, the Shakers composed over 10,000 original songs, hymns and anthems, more than any other communal society in the U.S.A. Their best known song is "Simple Gifts" (or 'Tis the gift to be simple), and Mr. Hall has written a book about it. He has presented numerous Shaker music programs at museums, schools, churches, historical societies and colleges. He has also edited and arranged Shaker spirituals for performance.

The (Old) Stoughton Musical Society -- organized on 7 November 1786, this is now the oldest choral society and has performed American music longer than any other chorus in the U.S.A. Their Constitution was written in 1787 just a few weeks after the United States Constitution. They were first called The Stoughton Musical Society and the "Old" was added to their name when then were incorporated in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in 1908. William Billings, America's first prominent choral composer, taught a singing school in that town and wrote a tune titled "Stoughton," which Mr. Hall edited and added a text by Isaac Watts, and it was first performed in 1986 for the Bicentennial of the Old Stoughton Musical Society. Mr. Hall was the Historian of this musical society and also Chairman of the 1986 celebration and prepared several special concerts for that anniversary. In addition, he has prepared a series of publications about music from Stoughton's past. Also, he is a Lifetime Member of the Stoughton Historical Society.

Mr. Hall is a prolific writer and editor and has produced numerous collections.
Here are some of the titles he has prepared:

Historical Music

See all the titles by Mr. Hall in the PineTree Multimedia Series -- click here

Also, Mr. Hall is an ASCAP composer with over one hundred compositions and arrangements to his credit.
His music is published exclusively by PineTree Music -- click here

Roger Lee Hall holds the following positions:

To read more about Roger Lee Hall see these links: